Islamic Wills

It’s important not to put off making an Islamic will. Should you pass on without one, the state will declare that you died ‘intestate’. Your wealth and possessions will then be distributed according to English rules on intestacy. These differ from the criteria laid down under Shariah Law.
There are other benefits, too:

  • You can avoid family disputes after you’ve passed away
  • You can appoint legal guardians of your own choosing for any children under 18 years of age
  • You can leave a gift to a charity to help them and you, too, because ongoing charity is believed to be rewarded after death.

At Barber and Co., our specialist solicitors can help with the intricate task of preparing a Shariah or Islamic will that’s fully enforceable under both Shariah Law and United Kingdom law. We cover the four main Islamic schools of jurisprudence (Maliki, Hanafi, Hanbali & Shafi’i).

Who’s entitled to what?

As a rule, a wife is entitled to one-eighth of the husband’s estate under Shariah Law and the husband is entitled to a quarter of the wife’s estate. Parents are also normally entitled to one-sixth of the estate. In intestacy, a partner will generally inherit more than under Shariah Law.

If anyone is financially dependent on you and you don’t make reasonable provision for them, they could claim against your estate.

You can leave up to one-third of your estate to beneficiaries of your choice, such as charities, or other relatives and friends.

Let us help you through the complexities of Shariah Law. Call us today on 01772 367 340 or email us here.

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